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Online Tutoriale Measuring I/O Performance on Linux for Oracle Databases

Posted by ascultradio on September 3, 2009

Measuring I/O Performance on Linux for Oracle Databases :

General

Oracle provides now a tool called Orion which simulates Oracle workloads without having to install Oracle or create a database. It uses Oracle’s I/O software stack to perform various test scenarios to predict performance of Oracle databases. Orion can also simulate ASM striping. So it’s a great tool for testing and optimizing Linux for Oracle databases. But note that at the time of this writing Orion is available on x86 Linux only and it’s still in beta and not supported by Oracle. For more information on Orion, see Oracle ORION.

Using Orion

WARNING: Running write tests with the Orion tool will wipe out all data on the disks where tests are performed.

In the following example I will use Orion to measure the performance of small random reads at different loads and then (separately) large random reads at different loads.

Before running any tests, verify the speed of the Host Bus Adapters (HBA) if you use SAN attached storage.

For Emulex Fibre Channel adapters in RHEL 3, execute:

# grep speed /proc/scsi/lpfc/*

For QLogic Fibre Channel adapters in RHEL 3, execute:

# grep "data rate" /proc/scsi/qla*/*

Go to Oracle ORION downloads to download the Orion tool. The downloadable file is in a compressed format that contains a single binary that simulates the workloads. To uncompress the file and make it executable, run:

# gunzip orion10.2_linux.gz
# chmod 755 orion10.2_linux

Make sure the libaio RPM is installed on the system to avoid the following error:

# ./orion10.2_linux
./orion10.2_linux: error while loading shared libraries: libaio.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
#

Next create a file that lists the raw volumes or files that should be tested by Orion. For example, if the name of the test run is “test1”, then the file name should be test1.lun:

# cat test1.lun
/dev/raw/raw1
#

Now to run a “simple” test to measure the performance of small random reads at different loads and then (separately) large random reads at different loads, execute:

# ./orion10.2_linux -run simple -testname test1 -num_disks 1

The option “-run simple” specifies to run a “simple” test which measures the performance of small random reads at different loads and then (separately) large random reads at different loads.
The option “-testname test” specifies the name of the test run. This means that test.lun must contain a list of raw volumes or files to be tested. And the results of the test will be recorded in files that start with suffix “test”.
The option “-num_disks 1” specifies that I have only one raw volume or file listed in the test.lun file.

A test run creates several output files. The summary file contains information like MBPS, IOPS, latency, etc. Here is the list of files of my “test1” test run:

# ls test1*
test1_iops.csv  test1_lat.csv  test1.lun  test1_mbps.csv  test1_summary.txt  test1_trace.txt

For more information on Orion and the output files, refer to Oracle ORION.

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