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Tutoriale Online Windows Server 2003 Family

Posted by ascultradio on October 6, 2009

THE WINDOWS SERVER 2003 FAMILY: WHAT’S IN A NAME ? :

What’s in a name? Apparently Microsoft believes there is much to be gained from shifting the name of its flagship operating system from Windows NT to Windows 2000 and then to Windows Server 2003. Since NT stood for “new technology,” the 2000 moniker seemed to herald a new millennium of computing. Windows Server 2003 is designed to take on the brave new world of Internet services. In development, the client and server versions were code named Whistler. By the time of release and despite common architectural structure, Microsoft decided to launch the client and server product lines with different names. The client versions inherited the Windows XP name to underscore what Microsoft hoped would equate to a new user eXPerience. The Windows Server 2003 line’s designation underscores its Internet readiness. In renaming Windows XP and Windows .NET, the company has created a family of OS products that addresses the entire market from desktop to the largest enterprise.  Compares the Windows NT and Windows Server 2003 product lines.

Windows XP Home and Professional Editions

Until the release of Windows XP, Microsoft’s client software was divided into two radically different architectures. Windows 3.x and Windows 9x operating systems were based on MS-DOS with a graphical front end. The last iteration of the MS-DOS operating system was the marginally successful Windows Millennium Edition. While Windows ME had a short shelf life, a few new design features, such as expanded device support, found their way into Windows XP. With Windows XP, support for MS-DOS ends. By contrast, Windows NT and Windows 2000 Professional were the first client operating systems based on the Windows NT kernel. Windows XP exploits Windows 2000 Professional with two editions…one designed for home use and one for business and small workgroup environments. Microsoft’s promotion of Windows XP has centered on the cleaner user interface, which reduces clutter and expands usability. In addition, Windows XP makes significant leaps in interconnectivity, multimedia support, security, general system stability, and Help functions. Although this book focuses on the server versions, Windows XP’s enhanced features are noted as they relate to administration. For a list of Windows XP’s specific features, see Microsoft’s Web site.

Table 1.1. Comparison of Windows NT and Windows Server 2003 Products
Windows Server 2003 Windows 2000 Windows NT Equivalent
Windows XP Windows 2000 Professional Windows NT Workstation
Windows Server 2003, Web Edition No equivalent No equivalent
Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition Windows 2000 Server Windows NT Server
Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition Windows 2000 Advanced Server Windows NT Server EE
Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition Windows 2000 Datacenter Server No equivalent

Windows Server 2003, Web Edition

The new addition to the Windows operating system server family is Windows Server 2003, Web Edition. Given Microsoft’s commitment to Internet readiness, this is a functionally focused Web server, as the name implies. It does not include many of the common features, like Active Directory, that other Windows Server 2003 servers provide. However, it is specifically optimized as a platform for Web services and hosting. With .NET Framework components like the innovative ASP.NET feature, the sharing of application services in a Web environment becomes possible. The Windows Server 2003, Web Edition facilitates the development and deployment of XML-based services and applications.

Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition

Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition refocuses the previous Windows 2000 Server version to address everyday organizational needs such as sharing files and printers and secured Internet connectivity. Like its predecessor, this version is designed for smaller client/server environments, but can manage a moderately complex organization. In system administrator terms, this server is best for an extended LAN and small WAN infrastructure, such as an enterprise that comprises a central office of modest size and several remote branch offices. Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition supports two-way symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) and up to 4 GB of memory.

Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition

Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition expands the core of networking and Internet functionality for medium and large enterprises. It is the default general business server operating system. Specifically designed for multidepartment use, it is equally well suited as an applications server and for e-commerce transactions. Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition supports up to 32 GB of main memory—a significant advance over the 8-GB limitation of Windows 2000. It also supports eight-way SMP and four-node clustering with enhanced load-balancing applications. Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition ships in either 32-bit or 64-bit versions.

Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition

Windows 2000 Datacenter was Microsoft’s first entry designed to seriously compete in the heavy iron marketplace of the enterprise. Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition provides yet greater availability, especially for mission-critical solutions. The crown jewel of Microsoft’s server line, it supports 32 SMP and eight-node clustering. This product is also available in 32-bit and 64-bit versions.  offers a comparison of features available with Windows Server 2003.

provides a quick reference for system requirements for each of the Windows Server 2003 platforms. In practical terms, the minimum requirements are woefully inadequate. The recommended levels should be regarded as a practical target.

Table 1.2. Comparison of Windows Server 2003 Features
Feature Web Edition Standard Edition Enterprise Edition Datacenter Edition
.NET Framework Yes Yes Yes Yes
Internet Information Services (IIS) 6.0 Yes Yes Yes Yes
ASP .NET Yes Yes Yes Yes
UDDI Services No Yes Yes Yes
Clustering Load Balancing Yes Yes Yes Yes
Cluster Services No No Yes Yes
VPN Support Partial Yes Yes Yes
Session Initiation Protocol Service (SIP) No Yes Yes Yes
IAS Internet Authentication Service No Yes Yes Yes
Network Bridge No Yes Yes No
Internet Connection Share No Yes Yes No
Active Directory No Yes Yes Yes
Metadirectory Services No No Yes No
Distributed File System Yes Yes Yes Yes
Shadow Copy Restore No Yes Yes Yes
SharePoint Team Services No Yes Yes Yes
Removable/Remote Storage No Yes Yes Yes
Fax Services No Yes Yes Yes
Services for Macintosh No No Yes Yes
IntelliMirror No Yes Yes Yes
Resultant Set Policy No Yes Yes Yes
WMI Command Line No Yes Yes Yes
Remote OS No Yes Yes Yes
Remote Install Services No Yes Yes Yes
Internet Connection Firewall No Yes Yes No
PKI Services & Smart Card Services No Yes Yes Yes
Remote Desktop Administration Yes Yes Yes Yes
Terminal Server No Yes Yes Yes
Terminal Server Session Directory No No Yes Yes
64-Bit Itanium Support No No Yes Yes
Hot Add Memory No No Yes Yes
Non-uniform Memory Access (NUMA) No No Yes Yes

Table 1.3. Comparison of Server System Requirements
Requirement Web Edition Standard Edition Enterprise Edition Datacenter Edition
Minimum CPU Speed 133 MHz 133 MHz 133 MHz x 86

733 MHz 64-bit

133 MHz x 86

733 MHz 64-bit

Recommended CPU 550 MHz 550 MHz 733 MHz 733 MHz
Minimum RAM 128 MB 128 MB 128 MB 512 MB
Recommended Minimum RAM 256 MB 256 MB 256 MB 1 GB
Maximum RAM 2 GB 4 GB 32 GB x 86

64 GB 64-bit

64 GB x 86

128 GB 64-bit

Multiprocessor Support 1 or 2 1 or 2 Up to 8 Minimum 8

Maximum 32

Disk Space for Setup 1.5 GB 1.5 GB 1.5 GB x 86

2.0 GB 64-bit

1.5 GB x 86

2.0 GB 64-bit

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